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Full text of "Green Years : Westwood High School yearbook"

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YEAR BOOK 
CLASS OF Icj^b 



CONTENTS 



vVeloome 1 

Dedication. ••• ••• •••• •• '2' 

Administration •••••• 5, 

Serving in Armed Forces » 4 

Class Pictures • 6 

Will 14 

Prophecy, •••• 17 

History SO* 

Candid Shots "... . '2S 

Superlatives ••• .24 

School Song 26 

"The Darling Brats" 26 

Officers (Sr.) and Year Book Staff 27 

Under Grads (Officers) 28 

Activities (Clubs and Organizations) 30 

Sports (Scores, and Pictures) 35 

Advertisements .-41 



I o^^o 



I 



yEL COME 




We of the Senior Class are happy to welcome you 
to VVestwood High, Mr. Thurston. We hope that this 
year has been but one of many eventful years for 
Westwood. We are grateful to you for your inspira- 
tion, your additions to our stjllnew school and its 
traditions, and the help and cooperation you have 
?^iven us as a class with our problems #^^^--^7 

^ C?7 




4r- '^ih 



DfD/CAT/0/V 




To you, Mrs. Smith, we of the Class of »46 wish 
to express our gratitude for everything you have 
done to make our years in W.H.S. memorable, for 
your fairness in our classes, the interest you have 
added to our subjects, the thoroughness with which 
you have taught us and, most of all for your instin- 
ted help with all our Senior projects. We hope 
that other Senior classes will be as fortunate as 
we to have you. 



m/mmATm 

4^ 



Q>fjiAJc^Csi/^Y.. Perley Eaton 

/ Superintendent of Schools 




FACULTY 

1st Row: W. Hulbert, M, Smith, V. Moody, E. Stephens 
R. xvicCarthy, M. MacQuarrie, J. Brimner, H. Marr, 
2nd Row: M. Keenan, R., 0»Neil, Mr. Thurston, Prin. 

H. Whiting, J. Dickerman, G. Sarris, G, Bader, 
F. Montague. ^ ^ 



S£/^l//A/G 



U.S. NAVY 

Robert Brooks 
Charles Bryan 
Robert Carr 
Roy Crocker 
Bradford Drake 
Donald MaCauley Grant 
Edwin Hani on 
Robert Jacobs 
Francis Maus 
Paul Scoble 
William Turner 
Alfonce V^ayshville 



U.S. ARMY 



Charles Mitchell 



U.S. MARINE 

Joseph Sheehan 

U.S. COAST GUARD 



Rawland Cress er 



SEN/ORS 




^^^ 





David Alcott^ "Cuddles" 

"The fellov; with the car" 

It's a sure thing that Dave will 
be a successful mechanical engineer. 
He has all the makings. \je hope you 
make i t , Dave i 

Vice Pros. 4, Pres, Student Coun- 
cil, Football, Basketball, Vice Pres 
A, A., Senior Play 

Barbara Ann kshcroi^ "Shorty" 
"Nam^'it, I»ll argue." 

Y\f«' ll^lv/aya rfemember Barbara as 
tall, J, Saonde, Vnd attractive. Her 
ambitAon is nu^fsing — then she wants 
to ae^DTxLe dovp in the country. Hope 
you^'jSiake ity^Shorty. 

NahataW News Staff, Orchestra, 
French Clifc 

Robert Anderson "Andy" 

"Happy Birthday, dear Andy" 



We remember Bob as tall, blond, 
quiet fellov/ of last year's class. 
How does Vi/estwood High seem after 
the Navy? Welcome to our class, 

Andy. 




Prsmels' Hunter Bagley 

"Anchors Aweigh" 



"FH" 




S the Navy'!s 
though J 



i ofi/J^g^^sa^ smanshi p 

a^J^eHunter as a 

&• ^yv gain is 

-^srii^ ^^^i^^ifxii^t 



^ 



^^.^r. 



Can » t/yoi^us^ 




rJay Bea" 
)nality" 



ea^A^Jean's soft, 

sayimg, "Nuriber 
JeanvJis vivacious and en- 

Yearbook Coinmittee, Nahatan Nev/s 
Staff, Senior Play. 



? 



"Snooks" 



Rosemary Burnett aK / 

"Evj^y Time/l)^lk I Walk 
WitljFR (ternary" 

eiaai^T'yAJj/sure is a popular gal, 
Anc^'iyii^^ she'll be even more 
popula]x//^en she's a nurse. Good 
luck, Rosemary. 



heJaa 



^ 



"Tonl" 



Antoine ti%a)ampe; 

"Mp^dabV, che( 

hasli '^'fejaecided w!R^at she wants 
-■el^ bu|c she majc^s a success 
e^verything sh^n^as ever at- 
*p^ij5 smart. She 
with brains. 
|4, Yearbook Comm 
;lan News, French 




aha^ 



Assistant Ed 
of French Club 




William Carl Carlson "Bill" . 
"99 44/100;^^ pure ambition" vj^ 

Bill wants to be an artis 
we know he'll succeed becai 
have seen what 



succeea Deca\:^q^^ m 
he can ^o. ^ k^ 

a.-Nahatoj^evi)p, Treas. 








Roy Crocker 
"Belli 




ttogi trousers I" 



"Roy" 



;all fellov/ and we 
his chair while 
ITavK^lne^s 1 Roy^s ambitious, 
»rKing hard at Dartmouth. 




Plijre 



^, 




havingv^^^ 

dresset? 

Plorrie 



a gooQ. nat-ujp^,' hair- 
>w^s the nkjpy these days, 



Glee Club 1,2,4 



^ 




<v; 






"Jan" 



Janice Goodrioiri / 

jgTi, etaab a sil^^l job making our 

pDe^e^'s.-^tJKtu^l her future will 

wiiJ^alon^vthdN^Jpi^ne of art work, and 
boy, iVslS^^ood] 



Gl 



te^ball 2,3, Cheerleader 2,3, 
lub 1,2,3 




Bessie Hale "Bessie" 

"Bessie with the Bustle" 

We'll remember Bessie as the girl 
who pla^T-ed the piano in assemblies 
and did a good job tool Bessie 
wants to be a teacher. 

School Orchestra, Piano soloist. 
Glee Club 1,2 Defense Stamp Program 



e 



Nancy Dean Hamblen \) A'JjSance" 

"Nancy -ith tne Ls^^J^dttnp^^ 

Nancy's aml5^?^on i s <^jl>o ^^^ajii medi- 
cal secretary, ^e ^j;^ofe^\}-%he ^^11]^ 
make good. Nancet;^^ very ^n^gef 
girl, ought to be good adVertiJs3( 
Tor the "Doc*" y 

Glee Club 1,2,4; Year book Comiri. 
Nahatan Nipws StafJ', Senior Tlay 



tan News btai ii, senior r 
ne.HJlonVr V 

^me' sVf gj&inV to be a 



Jeanne 

'Jeanne" 

Je^ie'sVf gi^lnV to be a steno- 
grag^ierp^k i^'on<Jt\ make a cute one? 
pyk swelfi 



sport and lots of 



Student Council; yearbook Coram 
Senior i'lay 



Arthur xH,arr 





Art Wants to b"^/ aJUlptrtTball star. 

He has already shoWli us v;hat he can 
do in that Ijrpe.^i^^it that line. 
Art I 



Basicetbal 



lC4^and f 



ootball 4 



ituth HolTman "Ruthie" 

Our "Dignii'ied Senior" 

Any boss would be proud to have 
such a dignified, sedate stenographer 
as Kuthie. She's a real lady. 

9 "^-002. 




(3 






John Hopkins rMA^ "lloppy" 

"^Idnce is golden" 

ive ' ll^iv;aysyA remember Hoppy as 
ti^e »e^t Qulk^ boy and maybe 
aj^rti^ ?iJij<^^ Joe, it»s 

the quiet* ones that get the breaks. 




"Peg" 



'eZ Ruby Jeflerson 
.."Sweet and Lovely" 

d(Jesn*'t know exactly what she 
wants to do, but we know that nomat- 
ter v/hat is is, she'll come out on 
top. \V3 justcouldn' t get along with- 
out her. 

Glass secretary 3,4, Yearbook 
Gomrri., Glee Club, Senior Play 



Hutn Kennedy 





Pep" 



"Kenny" 



LuckiT Is ^jthe boaif that hires 

^jjra secretary. S3ie is quick 
atje in everything she does 

Nahatan/ News, Treas. A. A., Sec. 
Yearbook Oomm. 



Louise Kierman „;;^- j. r\ q^UuIu"- 
"The ]^a^tmour(^ ^^air^ 

Tjb*\J::t§^^ is a^ swell ambition and 
v/e know mAu^jau^^^ her destina- 

tion ^bpya^s^ufse no nisefcter what she sets 
out to do, it's done. 



Cheer Leader 3 



10 






"Tote" 
squeaks i" 

get marrie 
old maid. TSITa 
* with thos 
sJ 

JYTreJsurer 3, Basketball 3, 
tjCoun^ll 4, Senior Play- 



Charles Mitchell "Mitch" 

"It's the Irish in him" 

Charlie is not only one of our 
best athletes, but he also has a 
quick mind. Let's hope he uses it to 
the best advantage. 

Baseball Manager, Football 




Mabe 




Pack^rjK^ ... "Candy" 

_ _jty and sw^t as a peppermint stick" 

\j Can)l^. you ittst see Mabel on a farm 
n Wraomt'J./^g^ is a very reliable 
i^l^e ^TOTji^. We can really depend on 
er. 

Glee Club 1,2,3 



"Perky" 
adpoles i" 

tion is civil engin- 

thejbr^ns for it 

gumption and 



Student Council, ^Ed'itor — Nahatan 
News, Senior Play, French Club, Year 
book Committee 



11 







Lionel Phllll 

TJ 



le 

Good for y 





Flip" 



to business school to 
eAiei^t. We knov/ It comes 
because of the nlftv 
aging our class as 
ing our Senior Year. 
Lee i 



Basketball 1, Football 3, Student 
Council^ Senior Class President. 

Maureen Powers "Rene'* 

"Our quiet, demure little miss" 



on*t those cniiaren be lucky 
th^t get Maureen for a teacher i 
h^'ll make them mind though i She's 
uiet but determined. By the v/ay, 
a^'t you tell she's Irish i 



rench Cli 



Ryan 
ustv;orthy" 



"Kittv" 



Kitty is the ideal pal--nice, and 
uiet. She wants towork in an office 
as a typist. Her success is a sure 
thing. 



Paul Scoble 



"Our Navy V.an" 



"Pea" 



Our loss is the Navy's gain. Paul 
really worked hard while he was at 
good old Westwood High. Good luck, 
Paul. 



12 



^^ j^j "^oM 



Joseph Vaux, Jr. 

"Hold it" 




"Joe" 



V 




Joe sure is handy v/ith the cam- 
era. But his ambition is to be a 
radio technician* More power to you, 
Joe. 



Class Photographer, 



Gwynn.e Very 



k ^ t 



Yearbook Comm. 



"Gwynnie" 



"Our most original" 

Gv/ynnie has high ambitions; she 
wants to climb Mt. Blanc J But seri- 
ously, her main goal is to be an ar- d 
chitect. Good luck, Gv/ynne J \ 

Basketball 1,2,3,4, Swimiaing, Art j^ 
Editor of Nahatan News, Yearbook Com^N 
French Club, Senior Play Scenery 



v;inifred Watson "Wlni" 

"You won't be satisfied" 







^Lu^ -/2.cA^c;^$.^-al. 



We hope Wini v/on't be as bored 
with life after graduation as she 
was before, 'whatever your goal is, 
we hope you reach it, Wini. 




s 
se 



e^t^y^ >^ y 



^tV-De;mur6 
mllep j^or 




"Bev" 




taff , 



3; GleeyCl^ $^2,3,4; Yearbook Comm, 
Senior Play'^ 




eryone, 
ch of a 



etball 2, 




13 



U/LL 

The late class of »46 hereby bequeaths its re- 
maining possessions ( that is, those which the irate 
faculty have not already conjugated) to said for- 
tunate, or otherwise, persons: 

To Kr. Chase, Mr. Lord, and Mr. Thurston we 
leave our eternal gratitude for not expelling us 
•on any of the many occasions on which v;e gave them 
opportunity. 

To Mrs. Smith v/e leave the honour of being the 
teacher to whom v/e are most indebted with our con- 
gratulations for having stuck it .out six years. 
Cheer up, you're getting rid of us now. 

'oVe leave Mr. O'Neil an axe to'prove his Lincoln 
like strength. 

We leave Miss McCarthy a little black book be- 
cause she has used up her old one on us. 

To Miss Hulbert we leave a pair of oobby socks. 

We leave Miss Marr a study hall (of boys). 

We leave Miss Stephens a French grammar. 

To Mr. Dickerman we leave some atom gas for his 
limosine. 

To Miss Brimner a nev/ method of shorthand that is 
easy to teach. 

V*/e leave Miss MacQuarrie a package of gum to see 
if she can resist the temptation of chewing it in 
class. 

, Vi/e leave Miss Montague a piano. 

To Miss Whiting we leave a basketball. 

To Miss Keady a supply of thermometers and ton- 
gue sticks. 

14 



Vt/e leave Miss Moody a book of passes. 

To Mr. Bader v/e leave athletes who stay in train- 
ing. 

To Miss Keenan we leave* a copy of the constitu- 
tion to aid her failing memory. 

Vife leave Mr. Sarris a lock from Einstein's hair# 



The private gifts of students v/ho are spring 
housecleaning are these: 

Wini Viiatson leaves her boredom with school to Sue 
Moore. (Does she need more?) 

Ruth Hoffman leaves her poise to Joan Pinlay. • 

Flossie Gehling leaves her wit (or is it wits?) 
to Margie Mulverhill. 

Mabel Packard leaves the Marine Corps with one 
exception* 

Lois Mace leaves her beautiful blond tresses to 
Betty Feaver complete with comb and mirror. 

Gwynne Very leaves her dogged determination to 
anyone who is willing to use it. 

Rosemary Burnett and Catherine Ryan leave their 
comradeship to Louise Reese and Smitty. 

Ruth Kennedy leaves her petiteness to her sister 
Jean. 

Janice Goodrich leaves her art ability to Allan 
Blizzard — not that he needs it. 

Jean Brown leaves her popularity to Nancy McLarai 
and her red plaid slacks to anyone v/ho has the cour- 
age to wear them. 

Peggy Jefferson leaves her beauty to Jean GoocMn. 

Nancy Hamblen leaves her bangs to Elaine Bigelow. 

15 



Joliri Hopkins leaves his hours in shop to Joe Iciy • 

Tony Gampenella leaves her genius to anyone who 
gets all A's every year. 

Art Harris leaves his athletic ability to Art 
Bent. 

Lee Phillips leaves his popularity to John Mc- 
Gilly. 

Joe Vaux leaves his ability for taking pictures 
to anyone who can get the flash bulbs. 

Jeanne Hanlon leaves her active participation in 

class affairs to anyone who would have the courage 

to step into the Senior class play at such a short 
notice. 

Bev. Webster leaves her vivaciousness to Nancy 
Upde graph. 

Larry Perkins leaves his editorship toFredOlose^ 

David Alcott leaves his good looks to Allan Bliz- 
zard. 

Bessie Hale leaves her good-natured helpfuHness 
to anyone who is that useful. 

Maureen Powers leaves her Irish temper to Eileen 
Johnson. 

Lulu Kierman leaves an advanced copy of Vogue to 
Fay Roberts. 

Billy Carlson for some strange reason leaves out 
his Junior year. 

Roy Crocker leaves a table of Logarithisms to Mr. 
Sarris. 

Charles Mitchell leaves his wit to Snuffy. 

Paul Scoble leaves a cook book (by himself) to 
Miss Moody. 

Hunter Bagley and Robert Anderson just leave 
again. 

16 



pmPHEcy 

Despite atomic bombs bursting and volcanoes e- 
rupting, the survivors of the Glass of »46 find 
life quite normal in 1956. Bombs are nothing com- 
pared to their vigorous existence in Westwood High 
School, while the volcanoes have a striking resem- 
blance to some of the teachers. 

No one is the least bit surprised to see that 
Janice Goodrich is sketching her lively twins in 
sailor suits as she hums "Bell Bottom Trousers." 

Mabel Packard makes a mighty cute farmerette on 
Allen's Vermont Farm. They take all the prizes at 
the county contests for their square dancing. 

Beverly Webster just received her "Oscar" for 
being the best sultry movie star of 1956. 

Barbara Ashcroft is reputed to be the best nurse 

in Gushing General Hospital. She gives her victims 

practical demonstrations in the laws of physics. 

(Don't you wish you were there, Mr. Dickerman?) 

The Postmaster General demands a draft for more 
mailmen to handle the heavy mails bet^-ieen the United 
States and Hawaii. 

Westwood High is now rated the best school in 
Massachusetts. This fact is due to Bessie Hale's 
efficient reforms. She even teaches Greek. 

We find Maureen Powers the matron of a mouldy 
castle in Ireland. She disciplines her ten child- 
ren by heaving books at them. (Got practice in 
Physics Class, didn't you Maureen?) 

Jeanne Hanlon and Jean Brown' have made a new 
United States flag because they believe that va- 
riety is the spice of life. (They ought to Imowl) 

Gwynne Very disappeared while climbing a mountain. 
Her ghost has been seen by various members of the 

17 



Glass of '4 6, wandering about in the saored portals 
of VJestwood High School. 

Lively John Hopkins is now training commandos. 
We like to think that he gained his skill on V^'est- 
woods' Superior Commando Course. 

Louise Kierman, who always set the styles for 
our class, is now the world's most famous fashion 
model. Bill Carlson is her managing agent, and it 
could be that his artistic abilities have something 
to do with her success. 

Our musician, Mile. Tony Gampenella, is now on 
a tour of Europe. The reports indicate that she 
caused quite a sensation in Paris, being the only 
American to set foot on La Belle France who can 
speak French v/ithout having a cold at the same time, 

V/hen handsome Dave Alcott drives by, the gals 
still swoon; but we can't tell what it is that 
causes such rapture - the car or Dave. 

Lois Mace's beautiful golden tresses are slov/ly 
turning grey - the reason being that she has just 
returned from Reno for the fifth time and is on the 
loose again. (She still can't make up her mind, 
can you Lois?) 

If we v/ant to travel all the way to rlgypt we'll 
find Lee Phillips - and this time with a harem of 
his own. He says it's the only life for him. 

Could that be Larry Perkins dashing through the 
wilds of New Hampshire with a skunk on his heels? 
Or maybe it's the other way around I 

Flash ICharlie Mitchell, the great detective, has 
at last found Art Harris, who, it is said, had engine 
trouble on his trip to Mars in a rocket ship, crash- 
ed, and wasn't heard from for four short months. 

Joe Vaux is now photographer for Esquire Maga- 
zine and says he finds the job quite interesting • 
But I should think it would be rather dull photo- 
graphing the latest in men's suits. 

Ruthie Kennedy can be seen almost anytime with 
her cap pulled over her eyes, coat collar turned up 

18 



and dragging behind her a "brief case containing a 
gun and "black jack belonging to her boss, "The 
Great Charles Mitchell." 

In her beauty shop Flossie Gehling just gave a 
permanent but she got to talking so fast and fur- 
iously that she didn't notice anything until the 
woman, upon looking at herself in the mirror, screa- 
med bloody murder. Now Flossie's on her way to buy 
a wig for her ex- customer. 

Our attractive Ruth Hoffman has acquired fame 
by discovering an antidote for chicken pox so fu- 
ture generations v/on't have their beauty marred by 
pox marks . 

A successful chain of laundries has been start- 
ed by Nancy Hamblen, their slogan being, "As Little 
Work as Possible." 

Peggy Jefferson is trying to pursue an active 
career but is hindered by the swarms of active men 
that pursue her. 

Thunderous applause greets the Burnett and Ryan 
Act as they introduce their nev/ routine on roller 
skates up at Roll-Land. 

Roy Crocker is now an Admiral in the Navy - he 
achieved this promotion because of his new revolu- 
tionary way of plotting courses. 

Paul Scoble is a typical sailor, pursued by a 
stream of admiring girls-much to his consternation. 

Hunter Bagley and Robert Anderson are the most 
promising orators in the Senate; their present de- 
bate promises to be as historic as the Lincoln- 
Douglas debates. 

\Vini Watson was so shocked to find that she was 
out of school and free that she had a nervous break- 
down and is in a sanitarium. 



19 



H/ STORY 

The fall of 1939 was Indeed a time of rejoicing 
for the class of '46. V«e didn*t start school until 
October because the new high school wasn't finished. 
When v/e started v/e found that we knew just as much 
as the Seniors. BoyI did we feel bigl Our classes 
v/ere enlivened by the continued stream cf architects 
and carpenters parading through the school with Mr. 
Chase to view its imperfections. Thus our years in 
the seventh and eighth grades passed quickly with 
our many social affairs along with the struggle to 
complete our homev/ork. This was our first year to 
experience homework. 

In September 1942 our Freshman year opened under 
the new superintendent, Mr. Eaton, Vi^ho has remain- 
ed with us through these four years. Mr. Lord was 
our principal and Miss MacH^^arrie and Miss Brimner 
v/ere our staunch supporters of parliamentary pro- 
cedure at those uproarious class meetings. 

The main event of the year, that masterpiece cf 
super acting, "The Taming of The Shrew", was pre- 
sented under the capable direction cf Mk Osterman. 

In the Sophomore year, our never- to-be forgot- 
ten professor, Mr. Sarris, cametous. On his first 
day here he proved to be a source of shock and am- 
azem^ent by his "Hitleritic" harangue through Room 
210, v;hile Mr. Brann, Mr. Sarris »s right hand man, 
took over the other half of our class in 212. 

\Vhile Coach Butler did his best to pull us thru 
that unending course of Plane Geometry, Miss Brim- 
ner tried in vain to teach us the difference be- 
tvv-een debits and credits. 

Mr. Bader was our home room teacher in cur Junior 
year, which was one of many changes. 

\Vestwood High lost to the service, Robert Brooks 
Robert Carr, Rawland Grosser, Bill Turner, Alfcnce 
Wayshville, and Chipman «Vesthaver. 

20 



The greatest part of our time was spent balanc- 
ing chemical equations under Mr. Osterman, or try- 
ing to figure out what the scrawling called short- 
hand could possibly stand for. 

After Mn Osterman left us we heralded the com- 
ing of Mr. Dickerman. 

Finally our Senior year opened under the faith- 
ful guidance of Mr. Thurston, who has been an in- 
spiration to accomplishment. Mrs. Smith was our 
untiring home room teacher and efficient coach of 
our Senior play. 

The latter part of the year v/as a time of great 
effort for those half dozen followers of Euclidwho 
spent many hours of the night wondering if it were 
really true that a straight line could be drawn 
thru two points. 

Due to Mr. Thurston's aid, the publication of 
the Nahatan News was again resumed successfully. 

Again we lost more boys to the service: Roy 
Crocker, Edwin Hanlon, Donald MaCauley Grant, and 
Paul Scoble. 

With the ending of six years' stay in Westwood 
High School, we are recognized as the first class 
to go all the v/ay through from the 7th to the 12th 
grades. During this time we have finished off one 
superintendent, two principals, three shop teacher^ 
and five French teachers. Q,uite a record, "ehl" 
We are also the first class to attempt the tremen- 
dous undertaking of a year book* 

With the above confessions we leave you with the 
hope that the rest of the years of our lives will 
be as eventful and hilarious as the past six of in- 
spiration to all those v/ho inhabit the corridors 
of dear old Westwood High. 



21 



CAND/D - 




22 



- SHOTS 




23 



WPmATIVES 



Most Popular Girl 


Jean Brown 


Most Popular Boy 


Lee Phillips 


Best Looking Girl 


Janice Goodrich 


Best Looking Boy- 


David Alcott 


Best Dressed Girl 


Ruth Hoffman 


Best Dressed Boy 


David Alcott 


Wittiest Girl 


Jean Brown 


Wittiest Boy 


Charles Mitchell 


Most Original 


Gwynne Very 


Class Genius 


Gwynne Very 


Most Dignified 


Ruth Hoffman 


Most Reliable Girl 


Ruth Kennedy 


Most Reliable Boy 


Larry Perkins 


Most Athletic Girl 


Lois Mace 


Most Athletic Boy 


Art Harris 


Chief Wolf 


Lee Phillips 


Best Natured Girl 


Tony Carapenella 


Best Natured Boy 


Joe Vaux 


Girl Most Likely to Succeed 


Ruth Kennedy 


Boy Most Likely to Succeed 


Bill Carlson 


Most Studious Girl 


Gv/ynne Very 


Most Studious Boy 


Bill Carlson 


Most Argumentative 


Barbara Ashcroft 


Class Flirt 


Beverly Webster 


Most Musical 


Tony Campenella 


Most ^»uiet 


Bessie Hale 


Most Ambitious 


Gwynne Very 


Favorite Song "I can't 


Begin To Tell You" 


Favorite Food 


Hamburgers 


Favorite Sport 


Basketball 


Favorite Radio Program 


Bob Hope 


Favorite Comic Strip 


"Lil» Abner" 


Favorite Movie Actor 


Gregory Peck 


Favorite Movie Actress 


Ingrid Bergman 


Favorite Big League Player 


Joe Di Maggio 


Favorite Newspaper 


Nahatan News 



24 



SCHOOL 
30/VG 



Let us sing a song for Westvvood 

For the school we love so well; 

Give a cheer for grand old Westwood, 

Let the mighty chorus swell. 

Sing her praise forever glorious. 

Make her fame ring out with might, 

Let us sing and shout 'till the hills ring out 

"Good old Vvestwood, green and white." 

We will sing our love for Vvestv/ood 

And be proud her name to bear; 

Vve will love to bring her glory 

And her lionors gladly, share. ( 

Sing with all your might for Vi/'estwood, 

Let us all her praise proclaim 

Make it loud and long, while her sens prolong 

Good old V'«estwood*3 honored name. 

Edmund W. Thurston, 
Principal 



25 



THE DARLING BRA-JS 




L.Mace, IT. Ferdinand, J.Brown, J.Hanlon, P.Jefferson 




Front Row: N. Hamblen, B. Webster, L. Perkins 
Back Row: B. Carlson, D. Alcott, F. Close 

26 




SENIOR OFFICERS 

A. Campenella, Treas.; L. Phillips, Pres.; D. Alcott, 
Vice Pres.; P. Jefferson, Sec. 




YEARBOOK 



Ist-A, Campenella, N. Hamblen, J. Brown, B. Ashcroft^ 
L. Mace, Miss Mac4uarrie.2nd-J. Hanlon, P, Jefferson, 
J. Vaux, G. Very, J. Goodrich. 

27 



(/NDCR ■ GRADS 




JUinOR OFFICERS 
N. Ferdinand, Pres.; V. Anderson, Treas.; M. Mulvehill, 
Sec; G. Savage, Vice Fres. 




SOPHOMORE OFFICERS 
W. Ross, Pres,; C. Bauer, Sec,; D. Johnson, Vice 
Pres.; H. Munroe, Treas, 




PRESHI'JAN OFFICERS 
E, Haslan, Pres.; L. Patterson, Treas.; N. Carson, 
Sec.; A. Long, Vice Pres, 




juintior high officers 

Ist-M. Ridley-Rep, C. Beltis-Sec, J. Savage-Pres, 
B, Draper-Treas , C, Peterson-Rep, Miss McCarthy. 
2nd-P. Montgomery-Rep, R.Thurston-V* Pres,F, Booth, 
Pres, N. Johnson-Treas . F. Pruyn-Rep. (absent when 
picture was taken; N. Coleman-Sec, N.Reid-V. Pres. 



ACTIV/TES 




STUDENT COmCIL 

1st — R. Has lam, N. Ferdinand, A. Long, R. Eastman, 
2nd-J, Hanlon, ?• Lydon, J. Carriere, S, Carr, ?• 
Smith, L. Mace, I.u ivlulvehill, J, Goodwin, Miss Kee 
nan. 3rd — P. Powers, L, Phillips, L« Perkins, A. 
Bent, D. Alcott, D. Johnson, J, Bagley 



30 




ORCHESTRA: Ist-G. Clcolanl, J. Ferrari, J. Saimders 
G. Bedard, R, Ellis, R. Thurston. 2nd-J. Henderson 
R. 'yVilkie, G. Holtman, R, iiiastman, R. Donnelly 




GLEE CLUB: Ist-D. Berquist, V. 0»Bocci, D. Wooding 
J» Martin, J. Eastman, P. Pond. 2nd-E. Anderson, 
C. McPaul, G. Bedard, N. Hamblen, V. LaRocca, J. 
Carriere, E. Parks, C. Kennedy, 3rd-E. J. Anderson 
J. Barnes, M. Lacey, P. Lydon, J. Grosser, B. Vveb- 
ster, P. Gehling, A. Olson 



51 




i^AHATAN NEWS: Ist-R. Donnelly, N. Johnson, N. Fer- 
dinand, F. Close. 2nd-B. Ashcroft, M. Anderson, 
J. Brown, ¥/• Carlson, B. Viebster, B. Feaver, M. Mul- 
vehlll. 3rd-M. Ridley, N, Hamblen, G. Very, A. BliZ' 
zard, L. Perkins, F* Roberts, S, Moore, J. Finlay 



HIHHB^JHP'^k^ ^^hll j^ ^\ 


flHHHIiHii 


^^^^IrvK^^^^m ^^1^ ^J 


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^^n^^^ « ^ /■K' IB^^H 


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^^^ff ' ^ ^ 1 


^aJ -^ 


H ' L. ^^ ' lJ 


it/ ^' Bigtf 


L^-Tt "tij^^^^B 




HHHHHIh 



FRENCH CLUB: Ist-W. Carlson, N. Ferdinand, A. Bliz- 
zard, L. Perkins. 2nd-G. Very, N. Hamblen, A. Carape- 
nella, D. Guise, L. Mace, B. Ashcroft, Miss Stephens 
3rd-M. Powers, L. Rees, J. Goodwin, L. Kierman, M. 
Mulvehill, S. Moore 



32 




JAZZ CLUB: Ist-L. Phillips, G. Savage, R, Donnelly, 
?• Close, G. Holtman, J. Pryde. 2nd-J» Kennedy, P. 
Lydon, V. i^nderson, C. MacKenney, N, Hamblen, 
A, Campenella, P. Jefferson, J. Goodwin, B. Feaver, 
Miss MacQuarrie, 3rd-P. Pond, M, Brov/n, E. Howe, 
L. Mace, A. Blizzard, A. Bent, T. Pruyn, P. Bothwell, 
J. Pinlay, S» Moore 




DRAMATICS CLUB: Ist-P. ^»hite, V. O'Bocci, J. Martin 
D. Wooding, 2nd-L« Bryson, A. Olson, G. Bedard, V. 

LaRocca, A. MacLeod, Miss Brimner. 3rd-G. Tiinmiillo, 
C. McPaul, C. Peterson, M. McCann, B. Draper 

33 




GUI-I CLUB: Lip, Thurston, Prln., E. Haslam, J. Vaux, 
L. Perkins, R. Haslam, K. i^elr, 2nd — K. Viebster, 
H. Kreidel, D, Richardson, L, Batten, R. Haltom 




HOBBY CLUB: Ist-R. Spencer, J. Ferrari, P. Johnson, 
P. Montgomery, R. i-hite, J. Henderson, P. Bernson, 
2nd-Vy. Harrington, C. Smith, G. Girling, C. MacLeod, 
M. Pugh, P. Parks, G. George, M, Alcott, Mr. Dicker- 
man, 3rd-C* McGoldrick, N. Jolinson, L. Patterson, 
J. Hamraond, R. Soderstrom, F. Booth, G. Cicolani,, 
R, Thurston 

34 



SPORTS 



1946 Football Schedule 



DATE 


OPPONENT 


PLACE 


SCORE 


Sept. 


22 


Millis 


Here 


6-0 


ft 


29 


Medway 


There 


0-19 


Oct. 


6 


Hanover 


There 


6-27 


It 


13 


Medfield 


Here 


0-13 


t» 


27 


Somerset 


Here 


7-7 


Nov. 


3 


Weston 


There 


0-27 


ft 


10 


Hopkington 


Here 


7-19 


fi 


17 


Case 


There 


7-40 






1946 Tri-County League 








Baseball Schedule 






DATE 


TEAM 




PLACE 


April 


26 


Medway 




Westwood 


April 


30 


Dover 




Westwood 


May 


3 


Bellingham 




Bellingham 


ti 


7 


Millis 




Millis 


fi 


10 


Medfield 




Medfield 


fi 


14 


Hopedale 




Westwood 


tf 


17 


Millis 




Westwood 


fi 


21 


Bellingham 




Westwood 


» 


24 


Hopedale 




Hopedale 


ft 


28 


Dover 




Dover 


If 


31 


Medfield 




Westwood 


June 


4 


Medv/ay 




Medway 



35 



1946 Basketball Schedule 



Boys 



DATii; 


OPPONENT 


PLACE 


SCORE 


Jan. 


4 


Minis 


Here 


54-20 


ft 


8 


Medfield 


There 


36-18 


tt 


11 


Somerset 


There 


43-48 


11 


15 


Canton 


Here 


33-18 


tf 


18 


Weston 


Here 


18-22 


tf 


22 


Medfield 


Here 


40-19 


tf 


29 


Somerset 


Here 


37-26 


Feb. 


1 


V/eston 


There 


13-34 


If 


5 


Wayland 


Here 


31-24 


tf 


8 


Canton 


There 


23-17 


ft 


12 


Wayland 


There 


33-31 


tf 


26 


Minis 


There 


47-22 



Girls 










DATE 


OPPONENT 


PLACE 


SCORE 


Nov. 


14 


Medfield 


Tiiere 


38-34 


If 


21 


Millis 


Here 


15-18 


Dec. 


6 


Millis 


There 


21-25 


Jan. 


8 


Medway 


Here 


21-25 


tf 


9 


Plainville 


There 


16-4 


ft 


15 


Poxboro 


Here 


29-33 


tf 


22 


Medfield 


Here 


19-15 


ft 


30 


Needham 


There 


16-33 


Feb. 


5 


Foxboro 


There 


8-12 


tf 


12 


Medway 


There 


19-21 


tf 


26 


Plainville 


Here 


12-15 



36 




BOYS BASKETBALL: Ist-xR. Watson* 2nd-C. McGoldrick 
P. McLaren, C. Jones, A. Holtman, D. Johnson, R. 
Watson, E. i&nith, H. Munroe , L. Batten, B. Ross, 
D* Smith, R. Raymond, 3rd-Coach Bader, P. Sheehan, 
J. McGilly, A* Bent, A. Harris^ A. Blizzard, G. 
Savage, J. Turner 




-7-m^^^ 



m ACTION 



37 



mmmmmmmm 



mmM}m, 



- ft f * , '« •■■' 

S IS II 14 , *• 5 







FOOTBALL: Ist-A. Bent, L. Phillips, C. I.Iitchell, 
D. Alcott, D. Patterson, A. Holtman, D. Johnson, 
P. Powers. 2nd-Coach Bader, W. Ross, A, Harris, 
A, Blizzard, G. Savage, P, Scoble, J, McGilly, P. 
Sheehan, J. Turner, G. ocherer, D, Richardson, 
Mr. Thurston, Prin. , Managers: R. Thurston, R.'.^atson 




IN ACTION 



38 




BOYS BASEBALL: Ist-P* LaVangie , K. Brewster. 2ncL- 
A. Blizzard, P, Sheehan, A. Bent, J. McGilly, J 
Turner, J. Pryde , H. Monroe. 3rd-K* Bernsen, R 
vmite, L. Patterson, D. Patterson, B. Ross, D 
Johnson, G. Holtman, E. Smith, Coach Bader. 




GIRLS BASKETBALL: Ist-D. Guise, G. Very, M. L^cey, 
L. Smith, N. McLaren, V* IJitchell, L. MacKenney, 
!• Meade, N. Updegraph.2nd-Miss Y/hitlng, N* Kelley, 
E. Bigelow, C* Vaux, R. McGllly, C. Paradise, B. 
Munroe, N. Sturtevant, P. Lydon, P. Rouillard 



39 




uJM' 



ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION OFFICERS 
D. Alcott, R. Kennedy, M. Mulvehill, G. Savage 




CHEERLEADERS 
B. Fay, V. O'Boccl, J. Martin, B. Papasedero 



ADS 




(0 




O 

CQ 



c/O 




O 




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CQ 
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afcixaxj^ at ooi/t serc/^ce'' 



DED.nOb 
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SLINGTON 



VAIL 6 

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C ompfiments 

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7-/ air dresse^r 

GAy ST. ISLINGTON 



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DED. 2200 S-95 HIGH 57: 



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S<i/ HIGH 57: PEDHAN ^9 
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C ornpfiments 



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THE 

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OPEN DAILY \1-\1 

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UE5TW00D MARKEA 



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QUICK SERVICE 

SEecTncoJ appliance dr«.<)to rtfxur 

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LET U5 SOLVE YOUR 
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THE COMPLETE TREE 
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DEO. /5-iO 
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SOMETHING NEW 
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DEDHAM CIRCLL 
SERVICE 

H.X BARTHEL 

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LxuSriccvftof) lire 5 
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3lS WASHINGTON ST 
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6'g3WAWING70N IT 
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THEATRE BLDG. 
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CHRY5UR- PLYMOUTH 
SALES «, SEBVlCt 



R 






4n LORlt^G Sr, 



DEO. 0O\MH 









• 






From the first formation 
of society, jewelry has 
been used as a means of 
personal adornment. The 
school ring serves an 
additional purpose--an 
ever-present reminder of 
pleasant school associatioi 
tions. 


FRANK A. FOWLER 
THE CLASS RING MAN 
828 Park Sq. Bldg. 
Boston 16, Mass. 


Westwood High School 
1946 rings 


OFFICIAL JEWELER FOR 

Class of 1947 
Westwood High School 


made by 






DIEGES & CLUST 

73 Tremont St. 

Boston, Mass. 




Representing 
Loren Murchison & Company 

Lib. 3162 






"This alDOve ail- 
To thine own self he true". 






Goipliments of Edwin P. Booth. 


COI^LIMENTS 
of a 




"Study to show thyself 
approved unto God, a wcrkman 
that needeth not to he ashamed". 


Friend 




COI^PLUffiNTS 
of 
a 
Friend 



CLASS OF 1946 



This v;as the year for freedom — 
You know just what I mean. 
►.We're Seniors i and nowhere xinder .the sun 
Can a jollier gang be seen. - 

Our Senior year has been v/onderful 
With play and banquet and all. 
We'll find it strange, exciting, and new 
Not going back in the fall. 

Of course we're sorry to leave you. 
Good old westv/ood High. 
But there's no use in grieving 
When parting time draws nigh.' 

So here's to good old Westwood. 

To the teachers thanks v;e give. 

We wish you the best of everything; 

Vie '11 be grateful as long as we live. 



Nancy Hamblen 



AUTOGRAPHS 







(i^T^ 







PAMPHLET BINDERS 

This is No. 1S24 
alM> carried In stock In Mie following •!«•• 



HIGH 
1523 9 ^. 

1525 t. •• 

1521 •« •• 

1521 WH " 

1521 11 " 



THICKNESS 



i^H 



1529 
1530 
1532 
1533 
t534 



HIGH 

Ivthm to 

•• 10 

•• 11 

•• 12 



THICKNESS 
H inch 



Other elxes cnade to order 



MANUFACTURED BY 

LIBRARY BUREAU 

REMINGTON RAND 

DIVISION OF SPKWWY RAND CORPORATION 



^'m.:mmm